After 1.5 years of actively pursuing growth and helping others to grow through my personal development blog, I realize there is never an end to the journey of self improvement. The more I grow, the more I realize there is so much out there I don’t know, so much that I have to learn. For sure, there is always something about ourselves we can improve on. The human potential is limitless, so it’s impossible to reach a point of no growth. Whenever we think we are good, we can be even better.
Historically, I’ve tried my best to remain positive and appreciate the process. I do my best to stay focused on the fact that all things in my life, both positive and negative, present themselves for a reason.
I read my first 10 personal development books in three months. It was after that that I met the girl of my dreams. She was an author and she lived in Australia—and, today, I am happily living in Australia with her.
Certain yoga poses facilitate the release of growth-inducing hormones in the body. The stretching and balancing exercises involved in yoga strengthen the muscles and improve the posture of the body as well. Try yoga poses such as the Triangle pose (Trikonasana), Cobra pose (Bhujangaasana), Mountain pose (Tadasana), Pleasant pose (Sukhasana), and the Tree pose (Vriksasana). You can also add Surya Namaskar to your fitness regimetoo.
An adolescent will say he loves you. But his conception of love is that he gets something in return (probably sex), that love is merely an emotional swap meet, where you each bring everything you have to offer and haggle with each other for the best deal.
In this week’s Nature, we explore how the working environment shapes research quality and morale — and what people can do to strengthen the research enterprise. A survey of more than 3,000 researchers reveals that lab heads view their labs’ practices more positively than do trainees. Roughly 40% of junior scientists say that their labs sometimes cut corners to achieve a desired end.
So when you scroll through Facebook, know that all those updates, photos and comments have been carefully considered. And when we compare ourselves, we have a tendency to compare the worst of ourselves to the best of everyone else. Not that you should compare in the first place; but it’s not a fair comparison. The funny thing is, people are probably comparing themselves to you. It’s not a healthy pastime. If there’s someone you find you can’t help but weigh yourself against, unsubscribe from their posts for a while. You’ll still be friends, but you’ll stop seeing updates. The ‘three good things’ exercise and knowing yourself will help in this situation.
Be Ordinary: “I can do whatever ordinary good people do, and avoid whatever ordinary good people avoid. My special abilities will develop in harmony only if my foremost aim is to be a good ordinary human being.”
As an academic department personal development has become[when?] a specific discipline, usually associated with business schools.[30] As an area of research, personal development draws on links to other academic disciplines:
“Never surrender your hopes and dreams to the fateful limitations others have placed on their own lives. The vision of your true destiny does not reside within the blinkered outlook of the naysayers and the doom prophets. Judge not by their words, but accept advice based on the evidence of actual results. Do not be surprised should you find a complete absence of anything mystical or miraculous in the manifested reality of those who are so eager to advise you. Friends and family who suffer the lack of abundance, joy, love, fulfillment and prosperity in their own lives really have no business imposing their self-limiting beliefs on your reality experience.”
Go for medium or short hair. You may think that longer hair would make you look taller. But in fact, longer hair takes attention away from your neck and neckline, making you appear smaller. Instead, opt for short or medium length hair. These hairstyles will put the emphasis back on your neck.[20]
These are things you come to understand about yourself because you question not only your actions but your interpretations of your own actions. You must sit and think critically about yourself and about what you’ve chosen to care about, not through word, but through deed.
4. Stop Procrastinating. Procrastination has been called the thief of time, opportunity’s assassin, and the grave in which dreams are buried. Fortunately, procrastination is not a character trait, but a habit. And just as you learned the habit of procrastination, you can unlearn it. Make better use of the time that you have by overcoming procrastination.
Certain childhood illnesses can also cause stunted growth. These can be avoided by regular immunization and intake of plenty of Vitamin C (which is found in citrus fruits like orange, grapefruit and lemon). There are a number of ways you can strengthen your immune system – by eating whole and fresh foods, and avoiding processed and hydrogenated foods such as the very popular margarine.
Up your zinc intake (oysters, chocolate, peanuts, eggs, peas, asparagus, and supplements). A zinc deficiency can cause stunted growth in children .[8] The best way to make sure you meet your body’s daily need is by taking a vitamin or supplement that includes zinc.
Many of your actions may already be geared toward “self-improvement”. This self-improvement, however, is mostly unconscious and for the majority of people it’s a case of pursuing “things” and “stuff” with the all-too-common assumption that when we get enough stuff, we will we be happy. You don’t have to search too far to find how wrong this theory is.
I wasn’t sure what to expect from a basic, self-administered yoga programme, but I hadn’t expected it to hurt quite so much. Sitting cross-legged hurts. The seated spinal twist hurts. Even the shavasana, the so-called corpse pose – lying flat on your back, arms and legs spread, palms up, toes pointing out – hurts. I am, I discover, a collection of small aches. As instructed, I contract the muscles in my feet and then relax them. My toes refuse to uncurl. Ten minutes begins to seem like an age.
There are, of course, a lot of self-improvement podcasts available – I found one titled simply You Suck: Be Better. Another, created by a former lawyer, suggested that I think of my time as if it were broken down into billable hours, so I learn to prize it more. I’d rather use my headphone time to acquire some actual information. I’ve got the happy book and the yoga routine already. What I really require is a little knowledge.
Wear slimming colors, and vertical patterns. Slimming colors such as black, navy blue, and forest green will help you appear taller. These colors make your body appear slimmer and works for boys and girls. Going for slimming top and slimming bottom gets you double the effect. Likewise, wearing clothes with vertical lines help accentuate height.
For everything you want in life, there is a price you must pay, in full and in advance. Decide what you really want and then determine the price you’ll have to pay to achieve it. Remember, to achieve something you’ve never achieved before — you must do something you have never done before. You must become someone whom you have never been before. Whatever you want, you’ll have to pay a price measured in terms of: sacrifice, time, effort, and personal discipline. Decide what it is and start paying that price today.
These people can then end up in a spiral of sorts. They vacuum up productivity advice and start waking up at 6 AM and putting cow piss in their coffee and meditating 30 minutes before breakfast and journaling with binaural beats in the background while visualizing their spirit animal.
It’s the time and effort involved that puts me off most kinds of self-improvement. Many years ago, I signed up for an online life-coaching course, and when I complained about the difficulty of one of the exercises I’d been sent – I was meant to make a list of my qualities, keeping to the strict format “I am (quality)” – the instructor immediately replied by email, saying, “Yes, this is REAL WORK, isn’t it?’ I thought: I already have a job, thanks.
Our height is determined by several genes. If both your parents are short, it does not mean you won’t be tall. However, if most of the members of your family from both sides are of short stature, then the next generations are most likely to be short. Genetic factors are entirely beyond our control. It has been found that about 60 to 80 percent of the difference in height is directly linked to genetic factors (11).
Of course, this is all from my personal experiences. Everyone approaches life differently and I think the uniqueness to this whole experience is that you are given the opportunity to shape your own destiny, find your own branding and such.
Then I went to one of his classes in a London studio, full of supple people in leggings, and found the whole experience nerve-racking and humiliating. It wasn’t relaxing at all. It was like auditioning for Cats.
Some psychologists advocate a positive psychology, and explicitly embrace an empirical self-help philosophy; “the role of positive psychology is to become a bridge between the ivory tower and the main street—between the rigor of academe and the fun of the self-help movement.”[33] They aim to refine the self-improvement field by way of an intentional increase in scientifically sound research and well-engineered models. The division of focus and methodologies has produced several subfields, in particular: general positive psychology, focusing primarily on the study of psychological phenomenon and effects; and personal effectiveness, focusing primarily on analysis, design and implementation of qualitative personal growth. This includes the intentional training of new patterns of thought and feeling. As business strategy communicator Don Tapscott puts it, “The design industry is something done to us. I’m proposing we each become designers. But I suppose ‘I love the way she thinks’ could take on new meaning.”[34]
9. Read More. You may have heard that knowledge is power, and one of the best ways to acquire knowledge is by reading. In addition, researchers have found that gaining new knowledge can satisfy our need for competence, which makes us happier.
When I was like four years old, despite my mother warning me not to, I put my finger on a hot stove. The stove was red and bright and shiny and I knew yummy food came from it, so the allure was irresistible.
Because I experienced so much hurt in my relationships when I was younger, for much of my early adulthood, I approached relationships in algorithmic terms: I studied books on relating to people and learned how to present myself in ways that minimized rejection, that gave me more influence over people’s perceptions of me. I pursued sex relentlessly, in an attempt to make up for the depth of my emotional pain with superficial, hollow relationships. For many years of my life, I saw friendships simply in terms of utility: I do this for someone so I can get something in return. And the moment a relationship began to cause me pain, I would find a way to escape it.
This kind of knowledge is learned by personal reflection, lots of time alone, and situations outside of your comfort zone. Those situations can be different for everyone – anything from enjoying a long lunch with a pen and notebook for company (no phone!), to solo travel. You learn a lot about yourself by jumping into an unfamiliar environment. And when you break through what you previously thought you were capable of, you’ll feel like you can achieve anything.
Understand that negative thoughts will always be with us. They create a problem when we allow them to fester inside and ruin our day. So there was bad traffic this morning. Instead of letting it fester inside and taking that anger out on others, learn to brush it off. Don’t allow it to ruin your entire day. It’s a day you will never get back.
One of the most difficult aspects of change is the need to make a day-to-day, hour-to-hour, and minute-to-minute commitment to change (Every time you miss an opportunity for change, you further ingrain your old obstacles). A helpful reminder of this necessity is what I call the Three Ps.
And Brinkmann does offer some advice that seems immediately worth taking. Go for a walk in the woods, he says, and think about the vastness of the cosmos. Go to a museum and look at art, secure in the knowledge that it will not improve you in any measurable way. Things don’t need to be of concrete use in order to have value. Put away your self-help guides, and read a novel instead. Don’t mind if I do. ♦
Do not care if people judge who or how you are and look. It might help you to know that people tease others for being too tall too — some people just tease because they’re insecure, none too bright or mean. Be proud of how you are and don’t change. If you’re still young (under 18 years) you might get taller yet and even if you don’t, you’re a valuable person in your own right.
Newsflash you are going to fail. You are going to fail many times in life. Failing is OK. In fact, you should embrace failure. When you stretch beyond your comfort zone, you are growing as a person. It is only natural that you will fail. Don’t fall for the lie that failing is bad.
1) The self-improvement junkie. Self-improvement junkies feel like they need to jump on every new seminar, read all the latest books, listen to all the podcasts, lift all the weight, hire all the life coaches, open all their chakras, and talk about all their childhood traumas — both real and imagined — incessantly. For the self-improvement junkie, the purpose of self-improvement is not the improvement itself, rather it’s motivated by a subtle form of FOMO (fear of missing out). The junkie has this constant gnawing feeling that there’s still some magic tip or technique or piece of information out there that will create their next big breakthrough (again, both real or imagined).
We all know and revere these stories. And the reason we know and revere them is that they’re uncommon. Because we rarely, if ever, are able to do these things ourselves. Most of us, most of the time, are stuck at the level of bargaining, of asking ourselves, “Yeah, but what’s in it for me ?” or worse, at the level of childish pleasure, screaming, “GIMME THAT, I WANT IT!”
Manage Stress Effectively. Too much stress can land you up in distress. It impacts not you’re your physical health but also your mental and emotional health. You must know how to effectively manage stress. There are a lot of stress management techniques available these days. So all you need to develop is the willingness to fight stress. Finding the means to tackle stress is not a challenge these days with help available at the click of a mouse.
But eventually, the exploratory phase exhausts itself. And not because we run out of world to explore. Quite the opposite, actually. The exploratory phase wraps up because, as we become older, we begin to recognize that there’s too much world to explore. It’s too much to take in. You can’t touch and taste everything. You can’t meet all the people. You can’t see all the things. There’s too much potential experience and the sheer magnitude of our existence overwhelms us.
He goes on to suggest spending “15 minutes writing about some positive things that have happened to you”. I am extraordinarily resistant to this idea. I only like writing about bad things that have happened to me, in part because I know I will never run out. At first, I can’t even think of any recent positive experiences, but after a few minutes, I recall a long and mostly tedious drive to Exeter the previous week.

Jump up ^ Mischowski, D., Kross, E., & Bushman, B. (2012). Flies on the wall are less aggressive: The effect of self-distancing on aggressive affect, cognition, and behavior. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 48, 1187–1191. doi:10.1016/j.jesp.2012.03.012